Articles:

What Does Brake Fluid Actually Do?

What Does Brake Fluid Actually Do?

As a person slows their car down at a traffic light, one doesn't really give the process of braking a second thought. It's just when you have to apply brakes as you are traveling at speed if, for example, a dog runs out in front of a car or you try to avoid another driver breaking the traffic rules in order to avert an accident. Without brake fluid in the car's engine stopping your vehicle might be near impossible as the brake fluid literally bridges the gap between man and machine. It is a non-compressible substance inside the brake lines and creates a force when the brake pedal is pressed. Of course, brake fluid does not last forever, and if you don't have your brake fluid changed regularly you run the risk of having it draw moisture and damaged parts of your car's engine. It is recommended to check the brake fluid in your car whenever you do an oil change, although brake fluid is good for up to five years. Since brake fluid also ages, it actually has a name for ... read more

How are Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) Repaired?

How are Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) Repaired?

If you are hearing about Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) for the first time, they are electronic safety systems installed in vehicles to help with driving and parking. ADAS is a vital part of most modern vehicles' safety functions. Besides your safety as the driver, they enhance your passengers' safety and other people you are sharing the road with, including pedestrians. ADAS Features Any car leaving the factory today has at least two or three ADAS features. They include: • Rearview, front, and side cameras • Computer imaging technology • Adaptive cruise control (ACC) • Autonomous emergency braking (AEB) • Autonomous braking system (ABS) • Intelligent speed assist (ISA) Functions of ADAS Systems ADAS systems play four main functions in your car, they include: Alerting you of any potential dangers on the road. Monitoring things like the tire pressure and any blind spots. To adjust settings to adapt to the surrounding environ ... read more

What is Hydroplaning?

What is Hydroplaning?

Hydroplaning Basics Did you know there was a term for losing control of your vehicle on a snowy, icy, or wet road? This is called hydroplaning. Hydroplaning happens when your car tires lose contact with the road and skim or slide across a wet surface instead. Speeding through light rain, snow, or ice can easily cause your vehicle tires to lose traction with the road and the car to "hydroplane." Loss of tire traction can result in unexpected accidents if your vehicle has an issue with steering, braking, or loss of control of the vehicle. According to experts, the first few minutes of wet rainy conditions are the most important. These conditions are more likely to cause hydroplaning than others as water, road debris, lubricants, and oils combine to create a slippery road service. People who are driving over 35 miles an hour under these wet road conditions are more likely to hydroplane than people driving at a reduced rate of speed. How to Prevent Your Car F ... read more

What Is Oil Sludge and How Does It Hurt My Car?

What Is Oil Sludge and How Does It Hurt My Car?

You probably have heard of how awful oil sludge can be for your engine. But what exactly is it, and how can it affect your car? Oil sludge is a thick gel that is formed when the engine oil is oxidized and contaminated. It is comprised of partially burnt fuel, metal fragments, and dirt. Oil sludge is then carried by the oil and you can find it sticking on the various parts of the engine. Why Oil Sludge Builds Up Oil sludge will first appear on top of the engine, inside the oil pan, and on the valve cover. The sludge can then block the siphon, and consequently hinder the circulation of oil within the engine. Sludge usually build-up due to several reasons, but driving in heavy traffic repeatedly is one of the main causes. Frequent driving for short distances and long periods of stop-and-go driving can also accelerate the build-up of oil sludge. How Oil Sludge Can Hurt Your Car As mentioned above, oil sludge usually has the effect of hindering the circulation of oil in your engine. Sin ... read more

3 Signs It’s Time for New Coil Springs

3 Signs It’s Time for New Coil Springs

Driving the same vehicle for several years can lead to natural wear and tear. Over time you’re bound to experience a decrease in performance at one point or another. Various issues can occur, and one of the most common is within the suspension system. Trucks that use coil springs can encounter several problems. Shocks and coil springs are critical for a car to support its weight and effectively handle potholes and speed bumps. Worn coil springs can not only cause an uncomfortable drive but a dangerous one. Damaged coil springs can make your truck unstable. Below are three major signs it’s time to replace the coil springs.   Your vehicle sags. Coil springs balance the weight of your vehicle. If the coil springs are damaged, the car will sag downward. You’ll notice this more if your car is packed close to weight capacity. The sagging may be unnoticeable initially but may feel like it’s leaning when you sit in the driver&rsquo ... read more

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Auto Repair